Monday, January 28, 2008

Decoupler @ Umber Studios

Artists Tucker Gerrick and Eric William Carroll join forces for an interesting commentary on love, life, and the demise of the once perfect relationship. In this unusual and personal presentation Gerrick and Carroll recount their romantic histories for the public eye. Filled with brutally honest works that sometimes suggest, and other times accuse - this show has sparked controversy between gallery-goers and most likely between the artists and their unsuspecting subjects.

Please comment on this posting below and give us your opinon of the show. Do you consider the personal nature of the work offensive or honest? Creepy or poignant? One thing is for sure - Decoupler made an impact on it's audience. Weigh in!

Show runs through Sunday February 3rd. Umber Studios is open by appointment only and from Noon-5pm on the closing day.

EVENT PHOTOS BY DIGITAL CRUSH












23 comments:

Anonymous said...

I really liked Tuckers work. I didnt realize until I got to the ring receipt what was happening. I sort of felt uncomfortable- like I was peeping in on his personal heartbreak. It was so sweet and so sad. What a pretty girl he had. I thought that was it, but this morning I was talking with my father about moving away to be with a man that I really like. I thought about Tucker's work and how much they gave up together and I just started crying at the Cafe where we were having Coffee. There must have been a barrier there holding back my tears because after that first cry, I cried about almost everything today.

Anonymous said...

The part that touched me the most was when he apologized to his father. That was really hard to see. I feel a deep desire to make my parents proud of me. Its hard when you fuck up.

typoscura said...

I am interested to hear about those who might have speculated that this show, in particular, my work, was accusatory in any way. I'd be lying if I said I didn't edit a good portion of things out that I felt were in fact very, very accusatory. The focus was not to paint a picture of a good guy/bad guy scenario...but was to be brutally forthright in the presentation of something that once was. All of the work involved was more or less never to be seen by anyone, but needed to be seen. As hard as it was for some to understand and appreciate said brutal honesty, it was even harder for me to continue to dissimulate the fact that something that was once so amazing, and was in ways the core of my very existence, had turned so dark. This show, and a small collection of recent experiences are the final pieces of the shitty puzzle I've been trying to complete for months.

Love it or hate it, I'm glad everyone came out...and in such strong numbers! I'm also elated that Eric and I's work has sparked discussion amongst others, and has been able to transcend the walls of the gallery and go home with each of the viewers.


P.S. I'm sorry I made you cry all day anonymous...

Anonymous said...

Tucker Garrick seems to be someone who inspires passion in his surroundings. I might stop there if I wanted to be kind but with that said, on Saturday night I found his half of umber studios to be a childish assault on his ex and nothing more. If only everyone had pretty white gallery walls to display their tatty breakup artifacts...

Anonymous said...

I thought this show was heartbreaking. Upon looking at the text messages printed on the wall I felt a little sick to my stomach, I've absolutely felt that way about someone before and I also remember how I felt when it ended. I definitely see why people are affected by this..everyone has had their heart broken to some degree. I don't think I saw anger in either Eric or Tucker's artwork - sadness and closure maybe? Or was it the final middle finger to the girls who broke their hearts whether the artists realize it/admit it or not?

I can honestly say I really enjoyed this show. I think both artists are quite talented. I do however, feel for the subjects of their work. I am not sure how I would handle it if I found out my ex did an art show based around my most personal communications and feelings for him.

eric william carroll said...

I feel Tucker and myself chose different strategies to address the same topic - the break-up. I think Tucker's art was so specific to his own situation that in a way it can be understood universally. If the notes and ephemera of his dissolving marriage were left out of the show, I don't believe the rest of his work would have been effective. I am curious in how it was taken as an 'assault'--could anonymous elaborate on that?

For my own work I chose to focus on other people's relationships, coupled with still lives from my small one-bedroom apartment. I guess I was going for a somber mood, but with a tinge of dark humor. That's the best way to take these things, right?

Anonymous said...

I wasn't the poster who called it an assualt but I guess if you were Tucker's ex you may feel that way. Imagine having your own personal love notes splayed out for the world (and especially your mutual friends) to see, without your permission. I am pretty sure I would be furious, despite the very cool presentation and lack of negativity if I was her. Tucker's work definitely hit home with me, I thought it was very honest and real.

Eric's work was amazing. It seemed to have a continuous melancholy but with definite humor. What beautiful photography and clever theming. I totally want the print of the date planner that says "get dumped"!

jessica, umber owner said...

"if only everyone had pretty white gallery walls to display their tatty breakup artifacts"...everyone just may. the pretty white walls may be the hearts of your friends that you vent your angry, hurt, irrational, gentle, torn, confused, loving, and imperfect thoughts onto.

were they really breakup artifacts? they seemed to be from a time where there was no hate, and no thought of breaking up. only love.

i wonder if the people who found this show offensive were actually reacting to their own fears. the pieces on the walls were writings of love and passion at its height. every human being has been at those heights, and has maybe written those exact words. and to acknowledge or realize that it might..for any reason or non reason..spin into a dark and heartbreaking place is a hard thing to admit. that even your love may just die. no one is untouchable.

Anonymous said...

I see where you are coming from Jessica but I think it could seem like an invasion from the point of view of the unsuspecting subject. I could tell Tucker was very thoughtful in his choice of "artifact" and did not come off bitter and angry, mostly heartbroken and nostalgic. A lot of people given this opportunity to put their feelings on display would choose to focus on the negative deconstruction of the relationship, so kudos to Tucker on that.

I do happen to think that venting to your nearest and dearest is much, much different than sending out a press release though.

eric william carroll said...

Good point. Gushing to your friends and family about heartbreak is completely different than posting about it on a bulletin board. I think the important thing to ask, however, is if Tucker's approach illustrated the sadness & beauty of a couple's collapse, or if it was simply therapy that he needed to get through tough times. Also, Tucker, I wonder how you would have changed the show if you knew your ex might have shown up at the opening...

jessica, umber owner said...

i wonder if its an issue of the social acceptance of how a person is supposed to break up...or lament...or show emotion..or not show any feeling at all.. over the death of something. i wonder why are we judging how someone experiences their own heartbreak.

i think people may have been unprepared for this medium of expression. it seems to be more acceptable to write a song about your love or lover and the demise of that love and sing it to hundreds of people, and perhaps even make money off of it. an iconic example: gwen stefani and no doubt.

expression through a song for thousands of people to hear seems to be socially accepted. but art shows..........

typoscura said...

Eric, that is a question I asked myself over and over after installation...I was wondering if someone was going to venture to ask.

Answer: Not one thing.

I would have added nothing, and subtracted nothing. I would have given her the mix CD I made myself, and instead of toasting everyone who came, I'd just tell her sorry.



In response to a few posts ago, I spoke candidly with numerous friends of my ex (my friends too) about the appropriateness of the content. The consensus was that the work although horribly sad shockingly upfront, was not that of a vengeful nature. I trust these opinions greatly, as they are from those closest to us (both), and are the most clued-in on our situation. I no doubtedly might react in a way that would be assumed (and previously mentioned), had the tables been turned around on. But I honestly believe that she would be ok with how things were presented. She'd be vulnerable, and out there...but then again, so am I.

TandE_lover138 said...

Tucker and Eric are both super cute! If they were my boyfriends I would never break up with them!

Jeremy said...

What seems to be over looked is the Concept of "Art!" What is art? and What is its goal? How are we supposed to react to Art?

Its a form of self expression, sometimes personal, sometimes abstract, sometimes...

One wise woman said "If you don't feel art in your head, your heart or your special bits, its not working"

If this were a billboard or a news report or something else meant to be impartial then yes it might have been inappropriate, but it is art. And everyone came to an art show to see ART.

I agree with Jessica's correlation to music.

Love it or hate it but who's to say whether it should be done or not? who knows how the ex feels about it, she may be in full support of this expression of a former loved one!

Anonymous said...

Does anyone know these girls? They should be able to voice their opinions here too!

Anonymous said...

How does the girl feel? If she is cool with it then I would say no harm done. But what if she was hurt by it? Is it worth it to hurt someone else? And some one that seemed to be loved so much?

Jeremy said...

"How does the girl feel? If she is cool with it then I would say no harm done. But what if she was hurt by it? Is it worth it to hurt someone else? And some one that seemed to be loved so much?"

And thats just it. We don't know. This is the kind of decision an artitst makes when doing something personal. Who has the right to judge how you or I creatively express ourselves in our Art, whatever medium that may be?

This seems like good art to me! It certainly has evoked alot of emotion. No offense to the person who left the first comment, but that is why I love art, because it draws out emotion. Sorry for your teary day, hope you feel better now.

Extreme Ash said...

wow. Thank you l'etoile for the forum. I can tell you - as someone who knows Tucker, EC, and the "girls" that this show (and this forum) were deeply emotional for me. I found/find myself laughing and crying at the same time while viewing both EC and TG's work. And I think the "girl" would have too. There was a lot of beauty, love, pain - and a lot of honesty in what was presented that evening. I think that can be respected.

typoscura said...

thankyou extreme ash, well put. I was hoping you'd weigh in on all of this.

Mike said...

Before I was able to see any of the works on the walls, most people told me that Tucker's side was some sort of depression non-thrill ride. However, once I was able to walk around and take it all in, I did and must now disagree. While the tone was markedly sad, it was nothing near a "childish assault on his ex and nothing more," as anonymous shared; if anything, it was a self-indictment.

Perhaps my proximity to the "decoupling" helps my view, but then again, I'd be hard-pressed to find anything accusatory in Tucker's work, and this is coming from a friend who at one time openly stated that he would have gladly punched the obvious party in the jaw. Ms. Extreme Ash will attest to that if need be. I believe that even when my bravado for violence was at it's peak, even then, I would have found Tucker's work a poignant apology to everyone that poured their love and emotion into his marriage, including the "girl," who I fail to name only because she has yet to be.

Simply, the entire collection touched me. I feel like I can remember the time in which each part came into existence. There is no doubt in my mind that I wish all would have turned out differently, but in the here and now, I find both of my friends coming out the other side of hell, and I have that to comfort myself with.

After all that...I forgave Tucker a little while before walking into Umber last Saturday, and his work solidified it. I apologize for ever wanting to punch anybody. As a consolation prize for EC, um, you ripped too, man.

Kate said...

In my opening statement on this blog entry...in using the word "accused", my meaning was...Tucker really opened his heart for this exhibit - he accused this girl (for lack of a better word perhaps), in a public forum, of breaking his heart. Which from an unrelated party, seemed to be the message, and an understandable one at that. I found this show beautifully sad and easy to relate to.

However, from a personal and honest angle, from someone who's been through the ringer with manipulators, stalkers, general creeps and users (is this normal, or do I have a bad track record?), I personally would have been hurt by this display if I were the unsuspecting subject, despite the thoughtful and non-demeaning presentation. Maybe it would be my own heartbreak, maybe my own insecurities, or perhaps the fact that my innermost feelings were laid bare for not only my nearest and dearest friends, but for a slew of random people to contemplate. I really, truly commend Tucker on his non-negative choice of fodder, which could have easily (and probably satisfyingly) been spun into something hurtful.

I only slightly know Tucker, who definitely seems to be an amazingly good-hearted, hardworking, and talented man. I think every one of us can relate to his feelings and what he exhibited - it is such a universal concept presented in a very straight forward way...People create art about love, loss, life, etc all the time, pretty much predominantly - whether its abstract or obvious. Thats what makes art personal and meaningful, and that is what I loved about this show in all it's simplicity...Loves deconstruction in the most honest terms.

David said...

so i didn't see this show at all, wish i coulda shoulda woulda... i'm down in rochester, learning more about the work of eric william carol before his show opens at the rochester art center feb 16th.

anyways good discussion. have to say that when i think about art about relationships and the balance between letting go and moving on i always think of stunt rock aka william flegal. peep the newest volume of regret:
http://www.dowiepartners.com/regret/

deals with the breakups and downs of life. it comes with music, though it ain't poppy like gwen stefani or popular radio breakup songs - which all can perfectly sum up a person's exact feelings while breaking up with somebody. this one is more a collage - which can also perfectly summarize one's feelings.
end blatant advertisement.

all this reminds me of lenny bruce who said his comedy wasn't funny all the time cuz it was truth. artwork about relationships seems similar to that, making the true into something more bearable, sometimes funny, sometimes tearful, sometimes the many feelings that people experience with life changing experiences. breakups and more. wish i coulda seen the show, sounds interesting.

A7 said...

i wish that i had seen the show; i'd like to have a beer with the artists and talk about the work sometime.